How to Choose Wedding Videography That Suits Your Special Day

Your wedding day is the most incredible day of your life, and a wedding video is a perfect way to remember such an occasion. But no two wedding videos are created equal. In fact, the wedding videography style you choose will dictate how your special day is commemorated forever, so it’s vital that you choose a wedding videographer who understands how to perfectly encapsulate your wedding experience. 

While many budding couples share universal expectations for their day (think emotive ceremony, beautiful flowers, striking dresses etc.), ultimately, your wedding is a unique experience to you – and so should be your wedding film.

With so much variation in what makes a wedding unique, why choose a standard, off the shelf wedding video package. Instead, select videography that caters to your specific tastes and style – enhancing the day and reflecting your personality. 

What do I mean by this? Take a look at the different wedding videography styles available below. 

Wedding Video Styles

The basic techniques chosen by your videographer can transform your wedding video into one of many distinct styles. Your choice of venue and location influence the video style, but there are still some clear differences in approach: 

Journalistic

This type of wedding video is more of a documentary-style video of the day – capturing an array of footage and then editing it together to tell a story. It will document the preparations, ceremony and celebrations – and sometimes also features interviews of the guests or you, the couple, to help capture how you felt on the day. 

Traditional

In years gone by, when video cameras were a new technology that many ‘have a go’ heroes bought to record family memories, traditional wedding videos grew in popularity. These videos tend to be full-length recordings of as much of the day as possible, capturing the speeches, ceremony, party and more. While the idea of not missing any of your day might appeal, you’ve got to be honest with yourself: do you really need hours and hours of footage? Not only will that lead to huge file sizes, it’s also a question of attention span: you’ll likely never watch the full thing and will skip to the ‘best bits’ – which is why other styles have surpassed this format.  

Long-form cinematic

Perhaps, the most popular choice in the modern age and certainly my favourite, cinematic wedding videos are typically vehicles for storytelling in a more organic way. They capture lots of footage and then edit it down to distil the essence of the day in a cinematic manner that focuses on movement, emotion and drama. Cinematic videographers tend to be more present on the day, requesting certain shots or scenes from guests and the couple. This can lead to a more active role for the couple but results in a more engaging video that will become a treasured memento rather than just a record of the day. 

Compared to older styles of wedding video, where a camera simply captured as much of the day as possible, a cinematic videographer instead learns to capture and convey your special day in a way that’s evocative, engaging and creates something to keep that you’ll love to show to your family and friends. 

Here is an example of a beautiful long-form cinematic film I shot of Lauren & Raphael’s special day

Short-form cinematic

A popular choice for most young couples, short-form videos edit down the day to a short, memorable video that can be anywhere from 3-4 minutes through to 15. In a short-form video, there’s not really time to include all of the speeches or ceremony, so it tends to favour cinematic shots. 

In reality, cinematic videos are the most popular choice for a good reason: they’re the perfect bridge between capturing the memories of your day without bogging it down with excess length. If you don’t want to pack EVERY detail of the day into the video, cinematic is the right choice. 

But not all cinematic videos are the same. The choice of venue and wedding type will impact the video, inform the tone and ultimately, transform the video into something deeply personal to your preferences and tastes.

Festival weddings

Outdoor festival weddings are something special – and the videographer should be taking the location on board before anything else. Outdoor environments pose specific challenges to your videographer – from masking glare and getting their exposure right, to choosing the right shots that make the most of the conditions. Likewise, tents and gazebos often have strange lighting conditions thanks to lanterns, which must be something the videographer is confident in dealing with. 

Beyond technical competency, however, is the direction of the video. A good outdoor wedding ceremony has a different feel from a traditional church venue. The video itself should capture some of the magic of the outdoors and the celebratory atmosphere of a festival. If you’ve chosen an outdoor venue, you probably have an affinity with some form of nature. Whether you’re a fan of the beach, wildflowers, woodland or anything else, your wedding video should be highlighting the very stuff that made you choose the location. 

Examples of this include the videographer asking you and your partner to pose in certain areas, taking b-roll footage of the surroundings to add some nature into your video and using the influence of nature to help direct the storytelling. 

If you’ve chosen an outdoor wedding, you need a videographer who can master the conditions and put the reasons you chose your outdoor location into the story told through the camera. 

Festival wedding

Church/traditional weddings

Traditional church weddings are something to be savoured – with the fundamental moments and details of the day etched in our collective consciousness thanks to films, TV shows and the vocal remembrances of our parents and their parents. Everybody loves a church wedding, and everybody knows what one entails.

Or do they? After all, a church wedding is still your day – with the choices you make influencing everything. Don’t feel that your church wedding needs the laundry list of traditional elements. Why, then, should a videographer just ‘go through the motions’? 

A church often poses challenging lighting conditions that a videographer needs to take on board, but the grand structures also provide lots of unique ways to shoot and lots of different ways to create stories as the ceremony gets underway. 

Suppose your wedding is taking place in a manor house or something similar. In that case, the videographer should be ready to direct the shots both indoors and out. They should know how to transition between rooms to follow the ceremony and afterparty and make the most of the amazing grounds most country houses offer.

Rustic weddings

Barns and farmhouses are becoming increasingly popular as wedding venues. From throwing a party in the barn to the ceremony itself, often held outdoors, rustic weddings have an autumnal aesthetic that differentiates them from the festival weddings I mentioned earlier. 

Think warm lighting, cinematic shots and a focus on intimacy. These venues are designed to feel soft and unique, so the videographer’s job is all about honing in on this. 

Realistically, weddings can take many different forms depending on your choices. Couples can opt for marriages in unique locations like cinemas and breweries, tie the knot in traditional church venues or head off abroad for their special day. The wedding videographer’s role is to understand how to interpret your personality, choices and venue to make a compelling video that becomes a treasured keepsake. 

I have vast experience in cinematic wedding videos and can create an entirely bespoke videography offering that suits only your wedding. Get in touch to learn more. 

How to Choose Wedding Videography That Suits Your Special Day

Your wedding day is the most incredible day of your life, and a wedding video is a perfect way to remember such an occasion. But no two wedding videos are created equal. In fact, the wedding videography style you choose will dictate how your special day is commemorated forever, so it’s vital that you choose a wedding videographer who understands how to perfectly encapsulate your wedding experience. 

While many budding couples share universal expectations for their day (think emotive ceremony, beautiful flowers, striking dresses etc.), ultimately, your wedding is a unique experience to you – and so should be your wedding film.

With so much variation in what makes a wedding unique, why choose a standard, off the shelf wedding video package. Instead, select videography that caters to your specific tastes and style – enhancing the day and reflecting your personality. 

What do I mean by this? Take a look at the different wedding videography styles available below. 

Wedding Video Styles

The basic techniques chosen by your videographer can transform your wedding video into one of many distinct styles. Your choice of venue and location influence the video style, but there are still some clear differences in approach: 

Journalistic

This type of wedding video is more of a documentary-style video of the day – capturing an array of footage and then editing it together to tell a story. It will document the preparations, ceremony and celebrations – and sometimes also features interviews of the guests or you, the couple, to help capture how you felt on the day. 

Traditional

In years gone by, when video cameras were a new technology that many ‘have a go’ heroes bought to record family memories, traditional wedding videos grew in popularity. These videos tend to be full-length recordings of as much of the day as possible, capturing the speeches, ceremony, party and more. While the idea of not missing any of your day might appeal, you’ve got to be honest with yourself: do you really need hours and hours of footage? Not only will that lead to huge file sizes, it’s also a question of attention span: you’ll likely never watch the full thing and will skip to the ‘best bits’ – which is why other styles have surpassed this format.  

Long-form cinematic

Perhaps, the most popular choice in the modern age and certainly my favourite, cinematic wedding videos are typically vehicles for storytelling in a more organic way. They capture lots of footage and then edit it down to distil the essence of the day in a cinematic manner that focuses on movement, emotion and drama. Cinematic videographers tend to be more present on the day, requesting certain shots or scenes from guests and the couple. This can lead to a more active role for the couple but results in a more engaging video that will become a treasured memento rather than just a record of the day. 

Compared to older styles of wedding video, where a camera simply captured as much of the day as possible, a cinematic videographer instead learns to capture and convey your special day in a way that’s evocative, engaging and creates something to keep that you’ll love to show to your family and friends. 

Here is an example of a beautiful long-form cinematic film I shot of Lauren & Raphael’s special day

Short-form cinematic

A popular choice for most young couples, short-form videos edit down the day to a short, memorable video that can be anywhere from 3-4 minutes through to 15. In a short-form video, there’s not really time to include all of the speeches or ceremony, so it tends to favour cinematic shots. 

In reality, cinematic videos are the most popular choice for a good reason: they’re the perfect bridge between capturing the memories of your day without bogging it down with excess length. If you don’t want to pack EVERY detail of the day into the video, cinematic is the right choice. 

But not all cinematic videos are the same. The choice of venue and wedding type will impact the video, inform the tone and ultimately, transform the video into something deeply personal to your preferences and tastes.

Festival weddings

Outdoor festival weddings are something special – and the videographer should be taking the location on board before anything else. Outdoor environments pose specific challenges to your videographer – from masking glare and getting their exposure right, to choosing the right shots that make the most of the conditions. Likewise, tents and gazebos often have strange lighting conditions thanks to lanterns, which must be something the videographer is confident in dealing with. 

Beyond technical competency, however, is the direction of the video. A good outdoor wedding ceremony has a different feel from a traditional church venue. The video itself should capture some of the magic of the outdoors and the celebratory atmosphere of a festival. If you’ve chosen an outdoor venue, you probably have an affinity with some form of nature. Whether you’re a fan of the beach, wildflowers, woodland or anything else, your wedding video should be highlighting the very stuff that made you choose the location. 

Examples of this include the videographer asking you and your partner to pose in certain areas, taking b-roll footage of the surroundings to add some nature into your video and using the influence of nature to help direct the storytelling. 

If you’ve chosen an outdoor wedding, you need a videographer who can master the conditions and put the reasons you chose your outdoor location into the story told through the camera. 

Festival wedding

Church/traditional weddings

Traditional church weddings are something to be savoured – with the fundamental moments and details of the day etched in our collective consciousness thanks to films, TV shows and the vocal remembrances of our parents and their parents. Everybody loves a church wedding, and everybody knows what one entails.

Or do they? After all, a church wedding is still your day – with the choices you make influencing everything. Don’t feel that your church wedding needs the laundry list of traditional elements. Why, then, should a videographer just ‘go through the motions’? 

A church often poses challenging lighting conditions that a videographer needs to take on board, but the grand structures also provide lots of unique ways to shoot and lots of different ways to create stories as the ceremony gets underway. 

Suppose your wedding is taking place in a manor house or something similar. In that case, the videographer should be ready to direct the shots both indoors and out. They should know how to transition between rooms to follow the ceremony and afterparty and make the most of the amazing grounds most country houses offer.

Rustic weddings

Barns and farmhouses are becoming increasingly popular as wedding venues. From throwing a party in the barn to the ceremony itself, often held outdoors, rustic weddings have an autumnal aesthetic that differentiates them from the festival weddings I mentioned earlier. 

Think warm lighting, cinematic shots and a focus on intimacy. These venues are designed to feel soft and unique, so the videographer’s job is all about honing in on this. 

Realistically, weddings can take many different forms depending on your choices. Couples can opt for marriages in unique locations like cinemas and breweries, tie the knot in traditional church venues or head off abroad for their special day. The wedding videographer’s role is to understand how to interpret your personality, choices and venue to make a compelling video that becomes a treasured keepsake. 

I have vast experience in cinematic wedding videos and can create an entirely bespoke videography offering that suits only your wedding. Get in touch to learn more. 

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